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Adding decimals to numbers


Posted by Randy Schneider on March 08, 2001 7:22 AM

I need to add a decimal to a series of numbers. e.g., my value is 50000 I want it to display as 500.00 Is this possible?

Please help!
Thanks,
Randy


Posted by Mark w. on March 08, 2001 7:28 AM

Clarification requested...

Randy, did you want to convert 50000 to 500 and
then display it as 500.00?

Posted by Randy on March 08, 2001 7:34 AM

Re: Clarification requested...

Mark, That's exactly how I want it to display. I just figured it out after I posted the question. I entered in #".#00 and that worked!!


Posted by Mark W. on March 08, 2001 7:41 AM

Really?

> I entered in #".#00 and that worked!!

How can that be? This isn't a valid format.

Posted by Randy on March 08, 2001 8:52 AM

Re: Really?

Excuse the typo.... it's #"."#00

Posted by Mark W. on March 08, 2001 8:55 AM

Re: Really?


> Excuse the typo.... it's #"."#00

When used with your original example, 50000, this
format produces 50.000 instead of 500.00.

Posted by Randy on March 08, 2001 8:57 AM

Re: Really?

Not on my end. Use 50000 this produces 500.00 I've tried it several times!

Posted by Mark W. on March 08, 2001 9:15 AM

Interesting...

What version of Excel do you have?

Posted by Jihi on March 08, 2001 9:23 AM

Re: Interesting...

What version of Excel do you have?

Mark I have also tried it like Randy posted #"."#00 and it also returns 50.000, but when I make it #"."#0 it does return 500.00. I am using excel 2000

Posted by sean on March 08, 2001 9:26 AM

I get 50.000

hi I tried it...I got 50.000...I'm using excel 97.

Posted by Mark W. on March 08, 2001 9:29 AM

This worked...

> Excuse the typo.... it's #"."#00

I could get #"."#0 to work.

Now let's discuss the wisdom of this formatting.
A formula referencing a cell containing 50000 and
formatted in this fashion wouldn't "see" this
value as 500. This could perplex the users of your
worksheet. Wouldn't it make more sense to convert
the value to begin with and then format it as 0.00.

Posted by Randy on March 08, 2001 9:59 AM

Re: Interesting...

I'm a using Excel 97 and using the #"."00 returns 500.00

Posted by Mark W. on March 08, 2001 11:51 AM

WYSIWYDG...

...What You See Is What You Don't Get...

Now let's discuss the wisdom of this formatting.
A formula referencing a cell containing 50000 and
formatted in this fashion wouldn't "see" this
value as 500. This could perplex the users of your
worksheet. Wouldn't it make more sense to convert
the value to begin with and then format it as 0.00.

Posted by Randy on March 08, 2001 1:08 PM

Re: WYSIWYDG...

...What You See Is What You Don't Get...


What ever Mr. Know it all!!!

Posted by Randy on March 08, 2001 1:13 PM

Re: WYSIWYDG...


So what you are saying that if you have a cell that has 50000 using the following #"."00 does not give you 500.00

I've tried this on several PC's and it works fine for me!!

Posted by Mr. Know It all on March 08, 2001 1:18 PM

Forget it


Posted by Mark!! on March 08, 2001 1:21 PM

Re: Forget it

I think you need to check it again MARK!!!!