How hard would it be to switch to Javascript or Python if Microsoft changes Office programming language, if u already know VBA?

makiwara

Board Regular
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
171
I think if somebody has a good VBA knowledge - programming basics, excel knowledge, object knowledge, binding etc..-
then if a switch would come in the language (js or python) then it would be fast to get used to the new programming language since our vba knowledge will still give us a lot of advantage (objects, properties etc would remain the same, the syntax like if statement or case etc would change only which is a day to learn with vba knowledge)

Only difference can be that Javascript is losely typed (dont need statemets like "dim x as integer" but it can be forced to need declarations by typescript)
What do you think, am I wrong?
 

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JLGWhiz

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Joined
Feb 7, 2012
Messages
12,979
Office Version
  1. 2013
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  1. Windows
What you see in programming languages like JavaScript, Python, C++ and others are all fairly easy to learn if you simply buy a book and sit down at the computer and apply the code and run it until you understand what the code does.. The reason they are fairly simple and easy is because the developer of the application that compiles the code did all the hard work of setting up the algorithms, dynamic link libraries, etc. that take the code the user writes and converts it to something the processor can understand. All of the modern programming languages are easy once you learn how the object model is set up and learn the syntax that makes things happen. But I think we will have vba and vbs hanging around a few more years, so I am not eager to learn a lot of new languages just yet.
 

makiwara

Board Regular
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
171
What you see in programming languages like JavaScript, Python, C++ and others are all fairly easy to learn if you simply buy a book and sit down at the computer and apply the code and run it until you understand what the code does.. The reason they are fairly simple and easy is because the developer of the application that compiles the code did all the hard work of setting up the algorithms, dynamic link libraries, etc. that take the code the user writes and converts it to something the processor can understand. All of the modern programming languages are easy once you learn how the object model is set up and learn the syntax that makes things happen. But I think we will have vba and vbs hanging around a few more years, so I am not eager to learn a lot of new languages just yet.
"Few more", what you think?

Btw we speaking about commercial use right now when speaking about end of language. Cause excel 2016 for example will be available for ever, so you will be able to use the learned technologies for personal use for ever. Even if vba wont be used commercially, nothing will stop you to do your own excel app in lets say excel 2007. Do u agree with me in this or not? Please let me know, I am very curios
 

JLGWhiz

Well-known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2012
Messages
12,979
Office Version
  1. 2013
Platform
  1. Windows
VBA was not originally designed as a commercial programming language. It was a mutation of the old Basic that was created for users of MS products to replace the old macro sheets that MS was phasing our support on around 1995. It compiles on the fly, but cannot be saved as a compiled program. It is basically just a tool, but it has been commercially exploited by by many where it can save time and manpower in a small business environment, or a localized department function in a big business. I know that our data processing managers did not like the fact that we in the various departments could write our own programs for limited functions within the department. It cut into their empires.
 

makiwara

Board Regular
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
171
VBA was not originally designed as a commercial programming language. It was a mutation of the old Basic that was created for users of MS products to replace the old macro sheets that MS was phasing our support on around 1995. It compiles on the fly, but cannot be saved as a compiled program. It is basically just a tool, but it has been commercially exploited by by many where it can save time and manpower in a small business environment, or a localized department function in a big business. I know that our data processing managers did not like the fact that we in the various departments could write our own programs for limited functions within the department. It cut into their empires.
thx for your thoughts, you are right.
Just one question:
"excel 2016 for example will be available for ever, so you will be able to use the learned technologies for personal use for ever." What do you think?
 

JLGWhiz

Well-known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2012
Messages
12,979
Office Version
  1. 2013
Platform
  1. Windows
I think you have more faith in Microsoft than I do. They have a history of making substantial changes to their application platforms and then terminating support for the old ones. The old ones still work, but not like the newer ones. things like file formats and byte size change and the average user has no idea why their old system is having problems when they try to install a file from someone else who has a newer version. I have watched the postings on the forums as new versions are introduced by MS and have seen the agony that some users endure while trying to cope with the changes. But it is like a bad habit that is hard to kick. We continue to use the MS products because they help us to do what we need to do in less time and for less costs. That about sums it up for me.
Regards, JLG
 

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