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Make Font Red If It Meets a Condition - Without Conditional Formatting


September 12, 2014 - by Bill Jelen

Before there was conditional formatting, there was custom number formatting. You can still add a condition to your custom number formats.

Make Font Red If It Meets a Condition – Without Conditional Formatting
Make Font Red If It Meets a Condition – Without Conditional Formatting
  1. Select the range of cells. Press Ctrl + 1 to open the Format Cells dialog.
  2. Select the Number tab. Choose Custom from the bottom of the list.
  3. In the Type box, enter a format such as [Red][>=90];[Blue][>=60]0;0

You can only specify two conditions, so a total of three colors, counting the final ;0 which will show the assigned font color for the cell.

You can only use certain color names… think back to the 3-bit color days: Blue, Black, Yellow, Teal, Red, White. But the little-known secret is you can use any of Excel 2003’s colors with [Color1] through [Color56]. For those of you who never memorized them, here they are:

Color Index
Color Index

This is one of the tips in Learn Excel 2007-2010 from MrExcel – 512 Excel Mysteries Solved.


Bill Jelen is the author / co-author of
Excel Dynamic Arrays Straight to the Point

The new Dynamic Array Functions are just one side-effect of an effort to completely rewrite the Calculation Engine in Excel. Joe McDaid and the rest of the CALC team have the laid the groundwork for all future functions in Excel. Yes, the first crop of SORT, SORTBY, FILTER, UNIQUE, SEQUENCE and RANDARRAY are awesome and powerful, but they are just the first of many new functions that will come to Office 365 over the coming years.