Error Checking in Excel
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Thread: printing formulas in Excel

  1. #1
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    I used to be able to print cell formulas in Excel by clicking the box in Page Setup, right along with gridlines. Now, having upgraded to Excel 2000, I can't find that "print formulas" option anywhere, nor any mention of it in Excel help files.

    Anyone know where this valuable option went?

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
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    There is
    Tools/Options/View
    Window options
    Check off Formulas
    hope that helps

  3. #3
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    Thought this might be helpful
    This will list formulas , cell address, and valves in a new worksheet,
    I think I got it off this board but donít know who to give the credit to.

    Sub ListFormulas()

    Dim FormulaCells As Range, Cell As Range
    Dim FormulaSheet As Worksheet
    Dim Row As Integer

    ' Create a Range object for all formula cells
    On Error Resume Next
    Set FormulaCells = Range("A1").SpecialCells(xlFormulas, 23)

    ' Exit if no formulas are found
    If FormulaCells Is Nothing Then
    MsgBox "No Formulas or the sheet is protected."
    Exit Sub
    End If

    ' Add a new worksheet
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    Set FormulaSheet = ActiveWorkbook.Worksheets.Add
    FormulaSheet.Name = "Formulas in " & FormulaCells.Parent.Name

    ' Set up the column headings
    With FormulaSheet
    Range("A1") = "Address"
    Range("B1") = "Formula"
    Range("C1") = "Value"
    Range("A1:C1").Font.Bold = True
    End With

    ' Process each formula
    Row = 2
    For Each Cell In FormulaCells
    Application.StatusBar = Format((Row - 1) / FormulaCells.Count, "0%")
    With FormulaSheet
    Cells(Row, 1) = Cell.Address _
    (RowAbsolute:=False, ColumnAbsolute:=False)
    Cells(Row, 2) = " " & Cell.Formula
    Cells(Row, 3) = Cell.Value
    Row = Row + 1
    End With
    Next Cell
    ' Adjust column widths
    FormulaSheet.Columns("A:C").AutoFit
    Application.StatusBar = False
    End Sub

  4. #4
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    You can toggle your formula view with:
    Ctrl + ~ (circumflex)



  5. #5
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    On 2002-03-03 20:22, Dave Hawley wrote:
    You can toggle your formula view with:
    Ctrl + ~ (circumflex)


    I thought it was CTRL and ` (the key next to number 1 :o)

    Regards,

    Gary Hewitt-Long

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