Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Error Value in Logical Test

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    What is the syntax for entering the error value #N/A within a logical test, as in =IF(G2=#N/A),0,G2).

    I've tried entering it with and without "" but no improvement.

    Any error value can be returned as 0.

  2. #2
    MrExcel MVP Aladin Akyurek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    The Hague, NL
    Posts
    83,613
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)

    Default

    On 2002-03-14 10:33, rambollet wrote:
    What is the syntax for entering the error value #N/A within a logical test, as in =IF(G2=#N/A),0,G2).

    I've tried entering it with and without "" but no improvement.

    Any error value can be returned as 0.
    =IF(ISNA(G2),0,G2)


    [ This Message was edited by: Aladin Akyurek on 2002-03-14 10:41 ]

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks so much....again. Less complicated than what I eventually came up with.

    Before I read your reply I discovered ERROR.TYPE function and ERROR.TYPE return values and was able to use it to denote #N/A in the logical argument, as in
    IF(ERROR.TYPE(G2)=7,0,G2), where 7 is the error return value for #N/A.
    (Not that you didn't know but for the benefit of readers who are less gifted as myself)

  4. #4
    MrExcel MVP
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Austin, Texas USA
    Posts
    11,654
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    On 2002-03-14 11:38, rambollet wrote:
    Thanks so much....again. Less complicated than what I eventually came up with.

    Before I read your reply I discovered ERROR.TYPE function and ERROR.TYPE return values and was able to use it to denote #N/A in the logical argument, as in
    IF(ERROR.TYPE(G2)=7,0,G2), where 7 is the error return value for #N/A.
    (Not that you didn't know but for the benefit of readers who are less gifted as myself)
    A Tip: Once you located the Help topic for the ERROR.TYPE worksheet function you could have clicked on the "See Also" link in the upper left hand corner. This would have presented you with a list of related functions which included the ISNA worksheet function.

Some videos you may like

User Tag List

Like this thread? Share it with others

Like this thread? Share it with others

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •