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Thread: Entering data in cell using macro

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    Let me try this one on. Is there a way, under macro control to enter a string of data in a cell. suppose, I want cell A1 to equal the string '= is there a code that I would put in a macro that would cause A1 to then equal that? Second, if there is such a way, could that code be used to put that string plus the contents of another cell in A1? Say Cell B1 equals MM1, would there be a way to put the '= plus the contents of B1 in Cell C1 as a string of characters which would look like '=MM1

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    To put the contents of cell A1 in D1 do:

    range("d1") = range("a1").Value

    To put the contents of cells A1 and A2 in D1 do:

    range("d1") = range("a1").Value & range("a2").Value

    I hope this helps
    It's never too late to learn something new.

    Ricky

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    Im gonna try that Ricky, thanks

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    Didn't work, rick. Using normal characters, it does work, but I have to combine the '= character with an unknown alpha numeric and it seems excell doesn't like me to combine that string with anything. gives #NAME error in target cell. This is driving me nuts, LOL

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    This should work:

    Code:
    Sub test()
    [a1] = "'="
    End Sub
    If something's already there, try:

    Code:
    sub test2()
    [a1].value = "'=" & [a1].value
    end sub
    Is this getting warmer?

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    By god, Nate, I owe you a beer. I am stubborn, presistant and a pain in the ***, but I knew there was a way to do it. That is perfect, hit the nail right on the head with that one. Thanks to everyone that I have pestered over the past three days with this. I can now filter undermacro control an alpha numeric string and return only the value I wish and not all the others that are similar. Good show.

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    Nate, I live down in mexico and have no books or anything, but am trying to learn this. Could you tell me what the [] means in that one oppsoed to (). I kind of understand the formula here except for those symbols. Thanks again.....ElGringo

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    MrExcel MVP Jay Petrulis's Avatar
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    On 2002-05-09 17:00, elgringo56 wrote:
    Nate, I live down in mexico and have no books or anything, but am trying to learn this. Could you tell me what the [] means in that one oppsoed to (). I kind of understand the formula here except for those symbols. Thanks again.....ElGringo
    Hi ElGringo,

    The brackets around the number are technically a shortcut way to use the Evaluate statement in VBA (although it is more limited than the full Evaluate).

    In this case, it is also a shorter way to say Range(your cell).value.

    [a1].value = "'=" & [a1].value
    is equivalent to
    Range("a1").value = "'=" & Range("a1").value

    I personally do not prefer this method, but it definitely is clean to see in code.

    Don't worry about the books. If you can, pick up on of John Walkenbach's Power Programming books and get a feel for VBA coding. If you stay around here, your knowledge will soon surpass John's writing in all but the more advanced chapters.

    If you can't get a book, by all means learn from the newsgroups. Ask questions and answer fi you can. If you are wrong, somebody will surely tell you -- and almost always in a nice way.

    Bye,
    Jay

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    MrExcel MVP Jay Petrulis's Avatar
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    On 2002-05-09 18:31, Jay Petrulis wrote:
    On 2002-05-09 17:00, elgringo56 wrote:
    Nate, I live down in mexico and have no books or anything, but am trying to learn this. Could you tell me what the [] means in that one oppsoed to (). I kind of understand the formula here except for those symbols. Thanks again.....ElGringo
    Hi ElGringo,

    The brackets around the number are technically a shortcut way to use the Evaluate statement in VBA (although it is more limited than the full Evaluate).

    In this case, it is also a shorter way to say Range(your cell).value.

    [a1].value = "'=" & [a1].value
    is equivalent to
    Range("a1").value = "'=" & Range("a1").value

    I personally do not prefer this method, but it definitely is clean to see in code.

    Don't worry about the books. If you can, pick up one of John Walkenbach's Power Programming books and get a feel for VBA coding. If you stay around here, your knowledge will soon surpass John's writing in all but the more advanced chapters.

    If you can't get a book, by all means learn from the newsgroups. Ask questions and answer fi you can. If you are wrong, somebody will surely tell you -- and almost always in a nice way.

    Bye,
    Jay

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