Can I DIM this?

jcassmyria

New Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2013
Messages
17
I need to DIM B$row# (example:B$1983) as a variable to use in a formula. How do I code this?

Thanks!
 

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Rick Rothstein

MrExcel MVP
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
36,691
Office Version
  1. 2010
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  1. Windows
I need to DIM B$row# (example:B$1983) as a variable to use in a formula. How do I code this?
No, the # sign is an illegal character in a variable name and, if you meant the # sign to be part of the name, it too is illegal (a # sign can legitimately be located where you show it, but it is not part of the variable's name, rather, it is a type declaration character indicating the variable is a Double). Here are the naming rules for procedures, constants, variables, and arguments in a Visual Basic module as taken from the VB help files...

Use the following rules when you name procedures, constants, variables, and arguments in a Visual Basic module:

  • You must use a letter as the first character.


  • You can't use a space, period (.), exclamation mark (!), or the characters @, &, $, # in the name.


  • Name can't exceed 255 characters in length.


  • Generally, you shouldn't use any names that are the same as the functions, statements, and methods in Visual Basic. You end up shadowing the same keywords in the language. To use an intrinsic language function, statement, or method that conflicts with an assigned name, you must explicitly identify it. Precede the intrinsic function, statement, or method name with the name of the associated type library. For example, if you have a variable called <code>Left</code>, you can only invoke the Left function using <code>VBA.Left</code>.


  • You can't repeat names within the same level of scope. For example, you can't declare two variables named <code>age</code> within the same procedure. However, you can declare a private variable named <code>age</code> and a procedure-level variable named <code>age</code> within the same module. Note Visual Basic isn't case-sensitive, but it preserves the capitalization in the statement where the name is declared.
 
Last edited:

jcassmyria

New Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2013
Messages
17
Basically what I'm asking is can I DIM a cell address where the row is kept constant? I then want to use this variable in a formula.
 

shg

MrExcel MVP
Joined
May 7, 2008
Messages
21,782
Office Version
  1. 2010
Platform
  1. Windows
Code:
Const iRowB As String = "B$1983"

Range("A1").Formula = "=" & iRowB
 

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