VBA code for Moonrise/Moonset calculation

kd4dna

New Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
25
Hi, I have been searching around various astronomical websites as well as here without much luck. I'm looking to see if any one has written VBA code to perform moonrise and moonset calculations in excel given the latitude, longitude, and current date for a given location. I have found one that runs sunrise/sunset as well as twilight times, but nothing for the moon times. I ran across some old basic code that I will rewrite (if I have to) but though I'd put out feelers here to see if anyone else has done it already.

Thanks,

Ron,
kd4dna@charter.net
 

kd4dna

New Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
25
Thanks, but not exactly what I'm looking for. I need a VBA function to calculate the rise and set times when passed the latitude, longitude, and date. I was hoping to find someting already done, otherwise I'll write it myself from some old code I found on Sky and Telescope web site.

Ron
Kd4dna@charter.net
 

kd4dna

New Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
25
Thanks to everyone for their help. I ended up rewriting some JavaScript code I found on the web. Works really nice.
 

chosenp

New Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2005
Messages
24
I've too just recently have been looking for an excel vba code to calculate moonrise and moonset times based on longitude and latitude.
If you created one that works great and are will to share, I would love a copy
Thanks
Keith
 

kd4dna

New Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
25
To Brandon,

I inadvertently deleted your e-mail, sorry. I have the finished code on my work computer. if you can send another e-mail I will provide additional information on the code.

Ron
 

youngsilver

New Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2015
Messages
1
Hello, Do you still have this VBA code sitting around? I'd love to check it out. I'm PM'ing you my email address now.
 

HarryS

Board Regular
Joined
May 2, 2008
Messages
201
Hello, Do you still have this VBA code sitting around? I'd love to check it out. I'm PM'ing you my email address now.
I would love to see it especially if you have it in a class module

I am eventually going to convert the 1998 code below into a class module but what is here may be some start started

[code\]


' A series of astronomical functions which may be
' useful. These are all 'user defined functions'.
' This means that you can paste them into spreadsheets
' just like the normal functions - see Insert|function,
' you can even use the function wizard.


' The disadvantage
' of Excel's 'user defined functions' is that they
' can only return a single value, and the function cannot alter
' the properties of the worksheet. Arguments you pass to
' the VBA functions you define are passed 'by value'.


' However, VBA defaults to 'passing arguments by reference'
' when a function is called from another VBA function! This
' can lead to a function giving a different answer when
' called in the VBA module compared with when called in the
' spreadsheet. Use the ByVal keyword to tag arguments you
' change later in functions. See smoon() for an example.


' define some numerical constants - these are not
' accessible in the spreadsheet.


'Public Const pi As Double = 3.14159265358979
Public Const tpi As Double = 6.28318530717958
Public Const degs As Double = 57.2957795130823
Public Const rads As Double = 1.74532925199433E-02


' The trig formulas working in degrees. This just
' makes the spreadsheet formulas a bit easier to
' read. DegAtan2() has had the arguments swapped
' from the Excel order, so the order matches most
' textbooks


Function DegSinxx(x As Double) As Double
DegSin = Sin(rads * x)
End Function


Function DegCosxx(x As Double) As Double
DegCos = Cos(rads * x)
End Function


Function DegTanxx(x As Double) As Double
DegTan = Tan(rads * x)
End Function


Function DegArcsinXX(x As Double) As Double
DegArcsin = degs * Application.aSin(x)
End Function


Function DegArccosXX(x As Double) As Double
DegArccos = degs * Application.aCos(x)
End Function


Function DegArctanXX(x As Double) As Double
DegArctan = degs * Atn(x)
End Function


Function DegAtan2xx(y As Double, x As Double) As Double
' this returns the angle in the range 0 to 360
' instead of -180 to 180 - and swaps the arguments
' This format matches Meeus and Duffett-Smith
DegAtan2 = degs * Application.Atan2(x, y)
If DegAtan2 < 0 Then DegAtan2 = DegAtan2 + 360
End Function


Private Function range2pi(x)
'
' returns an angle x in the range 0 to two pi rads
' This function is not available in the spreadsheet
'
range2pi = x - tpi * Int(x / tpi)
End Function


Private Function range360(x)
'
' returns an angle x in the range 0 to 360
' used to prevent the huge values of degrees
' that you get from mean longitude formulas
'
' this function is private to this module,
' you won't find it in the Function Wizard,
' and you can't use it on a spreadsheet.
' If you want it on the spreadsheet, just remove
' the 'private' keyword above.
'
range360 = x - 360 * Int(x / 360)
End Function


Function DegDecimal(d, m, s)
' converts from dms format to ddd format
DegDecimal = d + m / 60 + s / 3600
End Function


'
' calander functions. jday and jcentury work on the Julian day numbers.
' day2000 and century2000 work on the days to J2000 to reduce the
' number of significant figures needed
'


Function jDayx(year As Integer, month As Integer, day As Integer, Hour As Integer, _
Min As Integer, Sec As Double, Optional greg) As Double
' returns julian day number given date in gregorian calender (greg=1)
' or julian calendar (greg = 0). If greg ommited, then Gregorian is assumed.
Dim a As Double
Dim B As Integer
a = 10000# * year + 100# * month + day
If (a < -47120101) Then MsgBox "Warning: date too early for algorithm"
If (IsMissing(greg)) Then greg = 1
If (month <= 2) Then
month = month + 12
year = year - 1
End If
If (greg = 0) Then
B = -2 + Fix((year + 4716) / 4) - 1179
Else
B = Fix(year / 400) - Fix(year / 100) + Fix(year / 4)
End If
a = 365# * year + 1720996.5
jDay = a + B + Fix(30.6001 * (month + 1)) + day + (Hour + Min / 60 + Sec / 3600) / 24
End Function


Function jcentury(JD As Double) As Double
' finds how many julian centuries since J2000 given
' the julian day number. Not used below, I just add
' a line into the subroutines which then take days
' before J2000 as the time argument
jcentury = (JD - 2451545) / 36525
End Function


Function day2000(year As Integer, month As Integer, day As Integer, Hour As Integer, _
Min As Integer, Sec As Double, Optional greg) As Double
' returns days before J2000.0 given date in gregorian calender (greg=1)
' or julian calendar (greg = 0). If you don't provide a value for greg,
' then assumed Gregorian calender
Dim a As Double
Dim B As Integer
If (IsMissing(greg)) Then greg = 1
a = 10000# * year + 100# * month + day
If (month <= 2) Then
month = month + 12
year = year - 1
End If
If (greg = 0) Then
B = -2 + Fix((year + 4716) / 4) - 1179
Else
B = Fix(year / 400) - Fix(year / 100) + Fix(year / 4)
End If
a = 365# * year - 730548.5
day2000 = a + B + Fix(30.6001 * (month + 1)) + day + (Hour + Min / 60 + Sec / 3600) / 24
End Function


Function century2000(day2000 As Double) As Double
' finds how many julian centuries since J2000 given
' the days before J2000
century2000 = day2000 / 36525
End Function


'
' Conversion to and from rectangular and polar coordinates.
' X,Y,Z form a left handed set of axes, and r is the radius vector
' of the point from the origin. Theta is the elevation angle of
' r with the XY plane, and phi is the angle anti-clockwise from the
' X axis and the projection of r in the X,Y plane.
'
' in astronomical coordinate systems,
'
' item equatorial ecliptic (helio or geo centric)
' z celestial pole ecliptic pole
' x,y equatorial plane ecliptic
' theta declination latitude
' phi right ascension longitude
'


Function Rectangular(r As Double, Theta As Double, Phi As Double, _
index As Integer) As Double
' takes spherical coordinates in degrees and returns the rectangular
' coordinate shown by index, 1 = x, 2 = y, 3 = z
'
' x = r.cos(theta).cos(phi)
' y = r.cos(theta).sin(phi)
' z = r.sin(theta)
'
Dim r_cos_theta As Double
r_cos_theta = r * DegCos(Theta)
Select Case index
Case 1
Rectangular = r_cos_theta * DegCos(Phi) 'returns x coord
Case 2
Rectangular = r_cos_theta * DegSin(Phi) 'returns y coord
Case 3
Rectangular = r * DegSin(Theta) 'returns z coord
End Select
End Function


Function rLength(x As Double, y As Double, z As Double) As Double
' returns radius vector given the rectangular coords
rLength = Sqr(x * x + y * y + z * z)
End Function


Function Spherical(x As Double, y As Double, z As Double, index As Integer) As Double
'
' Takes the rectangular coordinates and returns the shperical
' coordinate selected by index - 1 = r, 2 = theta, 3 = phi
'
' r = sqrt(x*x + y*y + z*z)
' tan(phi) = y/x - use atan2 to get in correct quadrant
' tan(theta) = z/sqrt(x*x + y*y) - likewise
'
Dim rho As Double
rho = x * x + y * y
Select Case index
Case 1
Spherical = Sqr(rho + z * z) 'returns r
Case 2
rho = Sqr(rho)
Spherical = DegArctan(z / rho) 'returns theta
Case 3
rho = Sqr(rho)
Spherical = DegAtan2(y, x) 'returns phi
End Select
End Function


'
' returns the obliquity of the ecliptic in degrees given the number
' of julian centuries from J2000
'
' Most textbooks will give the IAU formula for the obliquity of
' the ecliptic below;
'
' obliquity = 23.43929111 - 46.8150"t - 0.00059"t^2 + 0.001813*t^3
'
' as explained in Meeus or Numerical Recipes, it is more efficient and
' accurate to use the nested brackets shown in the function. If you
' multiply the brackets out, they come to the same.
'
Function obliquity(d As Double) As Double
Dim T As Double
T = d / 36525 'julian centuries since J2000.0
obliquity = 23.43929111 - (46.815 + (0.00059 - 0.001813 * T) * T) * T / 3600#
End Function


'
' functions for converting between equatorial and ecliptic
' geocentric coordinates, both polar and rectangular coords
'


'
' Converts geocentric ecliptic coordinates into geocentric equatorial
' coordinates. Expects rectangular coordinates.
'
Function requatorial(x As Double, y As Double, z As Double, d As Double, _
index As Integer) As Double
Dim obl As Double
obl = obliquity(d)
Select Case index
Case 1
requatorial = x
Case 2
requatorial = y * DegCos(obl) - z * DegSin(obl)
Case 3
requatorial = y * DegSin(obl) + z * DegCos(obl)
End Select
End Function
'
' converts geocentric equatorial coordinates into geocentric ecliptic
' coordinates. Expects rectangular coordinates.
'
Function recliptic(x As Double, y As Double, z As Double, d As Double, _
index As Integer) As Double
Dim obl As Double
obl = obliquity(d)
Select Case index
Case 1
recliptic = x
Case 2
recliptic = y * DegCos(obl) + z * DegSin(obl)
Case 3
recliptic = -y * DegSin(obl) + z * DegCos(obl)
End Select
End Function


'
' Converts geocentric ecliptic coordinates into geocentric equatorial
' coordinates. Expects spherical coordinates.
'
Function sequatorial(r As Double, Theta As Double, Phi As Double, d As Double, _
index As Integer) As Double
Dim x As Double, y As Double, z As Double
x = Rectangular(r, Theta, Phi, 1)
y = Rectangular(r, Theta, Phi, 2)
z = Rectangular(r, Theta, Phi, 3)
sequatorial = Spherical(requatorial(x, y, z, d, 1), requatorial(x, y, z, d, 2), _
requatorial(x, y, z, d, 3), index)
End Function


' Converts geocentric equatorial coordinates into geocentric ecliptic
' coordinates. Expects spherical coordinates.
'
Function secliptic(r As Double, Theta As Double, Phi As Double, d As Double, _
index As Integer) As Double
Dim x As Double, y As Double, z As Double
x = Rectangular(r, Theta, Phi, 1)
y = Rectangular(r, Theta, Phi, 2)
z = Rectangular(r, Theta, Phi, 3)
secliptic = Spherical(recliptic(x, y, z, d, 1), recliptic(x, y, z, d, 2), _
recliptic(x, y, z, d, 3), index)
End Function
'
' precession (approximate formula) from Meeus Algorithms p124
' d1 is the epoch to precess from, d2 is the epoch to precess
' to, and index selects ra or dec. The function takes optional
' arguments dra and ddec to represent the proper motion of a
' star in seconds of arc per year.
'
' ra and dec must BOTH be in decimal degrees. This formula is
' different to the one elsewhere on the Web site!
'
Function precess(D1 As Double, D2 As Double, Dec As Double, _
RA As Double, index As Integer, _
Optional ddec, Optional dra) As Double
Dim m As Double, N As Double, T As Double
If (IsMissing(dra)) Then dra = 0
If (IsMissing(ddec)) Then ddec = 0
T = D1 / 36525 'years since J2000
m = 0.01281233333333 + 0.00000775 * T
N = 0.005567527777778 - 2.361111111111E-06 * T
T = (D2 - D1) / 365.25 'difference in julian _years_, not centuries!
Select Case index
Case 1 'dec
precess = Dec + (N * DegCos(RA) + ddec / 3600) * T
Case 2 'ra
precess = RA + (m + N * DegSin(RA) * DegTan(Dec) + dra / 3600) * T
End Select
End Function
'
' The function below returns the geocentric ecliptic coordinates of the sun
' to an accuracy corresponding to about 0.01 degree over
' 100 years either side of J2000. Coordinates returned
' in spherical form. From page C24 of the 1996 Astronomical
' Alamanac. Comparing accuracy with Planeph, a DOS ephemeris
' by Chapront, we get;
'
' Sun error
' RA sec DEC arcsec
' Max within 3 year 0.6 8.9
' Min within 3 year -2.1 -8.2
' Max within 10 year 0.6 10.9
' Min within 10 year -2.6 -12.5
' Max within 50 year 1.0 16.8
' Min within 50 year -2.9 -16.1
'
' Error = C24 low precision method - Planeph
'
' Note: Planeph was set to give output referred to mean
' ecliptic and equinox of date.
'
' The accuracy of this routine is good enough for sunrise
' and shadow direction calculations, and for referring
' low precision planetary and comet positions to the Earth,
' but is no good for accurate coordinate conversion or
' for eclipse or occultation use.
'
' Coordinates are referred to the ecliptic and mean equinox of date
'
Function sSunxx(d As Double, index As Integer) As Double
Dim g As Double
Dim L As Double
g = range360(357.528 + 0.9856003 * d)
L = range360(280.461 + 0.9856474 * d)
Select Case index
Case 1
' radius vector of Sun
sSun = 1.00014 - 0.01671 * DegCos(g) - 0.00014 * DegCos(2 * g)
Case 2
sSun = 0 'ecliptic latitude of Sun is zero to very good accuracy
Case 3
'longitude of Sun
sSun = range360(L + 1.915 * DegSin(g) + 0.02 * DegSin(2 * g))
End Select
End Function


' returns the geocentric ecliptic coordinates of the sun
' to an accuracy corresponding to about 0.01 degree over
' 100 years either side of J2000. Assumes ssun() exists.
'
' rectangular form is easier for converting positions from helio-
' centric to geocentric, but beware low accuracy (roughly 0.01 degree)
' of values
'
Function rSunxx(d As Double, index As Integer) As Double
Dim x As Double
Dim y As Double
Dim z As Double
rSun = Rectangular(sSun(d, 1), sSun(d, 2), sSun(d, 3), index)
End Function
'
' sun() returns the geocentric ra and dec and radius vector
' of the moon - calls smoon three times, and sequatorial
' three times - sequatorial calls rectangular three times
' each!
'
Function Sunxx(d As Double, index As Integer) As Double
Sun = sequatorial(sSun(d, 1), sSun(d, 2), sSun(d, 3), d, index)
End Function
'
' The function below implements Paul Schlyter's simplification
' of van Flandern and Pulkkinen's method for finding the geocentric
' ecliptic positions of the Moon to an accuracy of about 1 to 4 arcmin.
'
' I can probably reduce the number of variables, and there must
' be a quicker way of declaring variables!
'
' The VBA trig functions have been used throughout for speed,
' note how the atan function returns values in domain -pi to pi
'
Function smoon(ByVal d As Double, index As Integer) As Double
Dim Nm As Double, im As Double, wM As Double, Am As Double, ecm As Double, _
MM As Double, em As Double, Ms As Double, ws As Double, xv As Double, _
yv As Double, vm As Double, rm As Double, x As Double, y As Double, _
z As Double, lon As Double, Lat As Double, ls As Double, lm As Double, _
dm As Double, f As Double, dlong As Double, dlat As Double
' Paul's routine uses a slightly different definition of
' the day number - I adjust for it below. Remember that VBA
' defaults to 'pass by reference' so this change in d
' will be visible to other functions unless you set d to 'ByVal'
' to force it to be passed by value!
d = d + 1.5
' moon elements
Nm = range360(125.1228 - 0.0529538083 * d) * rads
im = 5.1454 * rads
wM = range360(318.0634 + 0.1643573223 * d) * rads
Am = 60.2666 '(Earth radii)
ecm = 0.0549
MM = range360(115.3654 + 13.0649929509 * d) * rads
' position of Moon
em = MM + ecm * Sin(MM) * (1# + ecm * Cos(MM))
xv = Am * (Cos(em) - ecm)
yv = Am * (Sqr(1# - ecm * ecm) * Sin(em))
vm = Application.Atan2(xv, yv)
' If vm < 0 Then vm = tpi + vm
rm = Sqr(xv * xv + yv * yv)
x = rm * (Cos(Nm) * Cos(vm + wM) - Sin(Nm) * Sin(vm + wM) * Cos(im))
y = rm * (Sin(Nm) * Cos(vm + wM) + Cos(Nm) * Sin(vm + wM) * Cos(im))
z = rm * (Sin(vm + wM) * Sin(im))
' moons geocentric long and lat
lon = Application.Atan2(x, y)
If lon < 0 Then lon = tpi + lon
Lat = Atn(z / Sqr(x * x + y * y))
' mean longitude of sun
ws = range360(282.9404 + 0.0000470935 * d) * rads
Ms = range360(356.047 + 0.9856002585 * d) * rads
' perturbations
' first calculate arguments below,
'Ms, Mm Mean Anomaly of the Sun and the Moon
'Nm Longitude of the Moon's node
'ws, wm Argument of perihelion for the Sun and the Moon
ls = Ms + ws 'Mean Longitude of the Sun (Ns=0)
lm = MM + wM + Nm 'Mean longitude of the Moon
dm = lm - ls 'Mean elongation of the Moon
f = lm - Nm 'Argument of latitude for the Moon
' then add the following terms to the longitude
' note amplitudes are in degrees, convert at end
Select Case index
Case 1 ' distance terms earth radii
rm = rm - 0.58 * Cos(MM - 2 * dm)
rm = rm - 0.46 * Cos(2 * dm)
smoon = rm
Case 2 ' latitude terms
dlat = -0.173 * Sin(f - 2 * dm)
dlat = dlat - 0.055 * Sin(MM - f - 2 * dm)
dlat = dlat - 0.046 * Sin(MM + f - 2 * dm)
dlat = dlat + 0.033 * Sin(f + 2 * dm)
dlat = dlat + 0.017 * Sin(2 * MM + f)
smoon = Lat * degs + dlat
Case 3 ' longitude terms
dlon = -1.274 * Sin(MM - 2 * dm) '(the Evection)
dlon = dlon + 0.658 * Sin(2 * dm) '(the Variation)
dlon = dlon - 0.186 * Sin(Ms) '(the Yearly Equation)
dlon = dlon - 0.059 * Sin(2 * MM - 2 * dm)
dlon = dlon - 0.057 * Sin(MM - 2 * dm + Ms)
dlon = dlon + 0.053 * Sin(MM + 2 * dm)
dlon = dlon + 0.046 * Sin(2 * dm - Ms)
dlon = dlon + 0.041 * Sin(MM - Ms)
dlon = dlon - 0.035 * Sin(dm) '(the Parallactic Equation)
dlon = dlon - 0.031 * Sin(MM + Ms)
dlon = dlon - 0.015 * Sin(2 * f - 2 * dm)
dlon = dlon + 0.011 * Sin(MM - 4 * dm)
smoon = lon * degs + dlon
End Select
End Function
'
' rmoon uses smoon to return the geocentric ecliptic rectangular coordinates
' of the moon to lowish accuracy.
'
'
Function rmoonxx(d As Double, index As Integer) As Double
rmoon = Rectangular(smoon(d, 1), smoon(d, 2), smoon(d, 3), index)
End Function
'
' moon() returns the geocentric ra and dec and radius vector
' of the moon - calls smoon three times, and sequatorial
' three times - sequatorial calls rectangular three times
' each!
'
Function moonxx(d As Double, index As Integer) As Double
Dim nigel As Double
If index = 4 Then
nigel = smoon(d, 2)
moon = d
Else
moon = sequatorial(smoon(d, 1), smoon(d, 2), smoon(d, 3), d, index)
End If
End Function
'
' Solutions of the kepler equation using a Newton's method approach.
' See Meeus or Duffett-Smith (calculator)
'
Function kepler(m As Double, ecc As Double, Optional eps)
' solves the equation e - ecc*sin(e) = m for e given an m
' returns the value of the 'true anomaly' in rads
' m - the 'mean anomaly' in rads
' ecc - the eccentricity of the orbit
' eps - the precision parameter - solution will be
' within 10^-eps of the true value.
' don't set eps above 14, as convergence
' can't be guaranteed. If not specified, then
' taken as 10^-8 or 10 nano radians!
'
Dim delta As Double, e As Double, v As Double

e = m 'first guess
delta = 0.05 'set delta equal to a dummy value
If (IsMissing(eps)) Then eps = 8 'if no eps then assume 10^-8
Do While Abs(delta) >= 10 ^ -eps 'converged?
delta = e - ecc * Sin(e) - m 'new error
e = e - delta / (1 - ecc * Cos(e)) 'corrected guess
Loop
v = 2 * Atn(((1 + ecc) / (1 - ecc)) ^ 0.5 * Tan(0.5 * e))
If v < 0 Then v = v + tpi
kepler = v
End Function
'
' The functions below return the heliocentric ecliptic coordinates
' of the planets to an accuracy of a few minutes of arc. The coordinates
' are referred to the equinox of J2000.0
'
' The functions use a simple Kepler ellipse, but with
' mean elements which change slightly with the time since
' J2000. See 'Explanatory supplement to the Astronomical
' Almanac' 1992, page 316, table 5.8.1. Worst case errors
' over the period 1800 - 2050 AD in arcsec are below;
'
' Ra Dec
' Mercury 20" 5"
' Venus 20" 5"
' Earth 20" 5"
' Mars 25" 30"
' Jupiter 300" 100"
' Saturn 600" 200"
' Uranus 60" 25"
' Neptune 40" 20"
' Pluto 40" 10"
'


'
' The rplanet() function returns the ecliptic heliocentric coordinates
' of each of the major planets. You select the planet you want using
' pnumber, and the coordinate you want with index as usual.
'
Function rplanetxx(d As Double, pnumber As Integer, index As Integer) As Double
Dim x As Double, y As Double, z As Double, v As Double, m As Double, _
I As Double, O As Double, P As Double, a As Double, e As Double, _
L As Double, r As Double
'
' get elements of the planet
'
Element I, O, P, a, e, L, d, pnumber
'
' position of planet in its orbit
'
m = range2pi(L - P)
v = kepler(m, e, 8)
r = a * (1 - e * e) / (1 + e * Cos(v))
'
' heliocentric rectangular coordinates of planet
'
Select Case index
Case 1 'x coordinate
rplanet = r * (Cos(O) * Cos(v + P - O) - Sin(O) * Sin(v + P - O) * Cos(I))
Case 2 'y coordinate
rplanet = r * (Sin(O) * Cos(v + P - O) + Cos(O) * Sin(v + P - O) * Cos(I))
Case 3 'z coordinate
rplanet = r * (Sin(v + P - O) * Sin(I))
End Select
End Function
'
'
' The planet() function returns the equatorial geocentric coordinates
' of each of the major planets. You select the planet you want using
' pnumber, and the coordinate you want with index as usual. Code is
' duplicated from rplanet() to reduce the number of calls to kepler()
'
'
Function planetxx(d As Double, pnumber As Integer, index As Integer) As Double
Dim x As Double, y As Double, z As Double, v As Double, m As Double, _
I As Double, O As Double, P As Double, a As Double, e As Double, _
L As Double, r As Double, xe As Double, ye As Double, ze As Double, _
s1 As Double, si As Double, so As Double, c1 As Double, Ci As Double, _
co As Double
'
' elements of planet - select from the values
'
Element I, O, P, a, e, L, d, pnumber
'
' position of planet in its orbit
'
m = range2pi(L - P)
v = kepler(m, e, 8)
r = a * (1 - e * e) / (1 + e * Cos(v))
'
' heliocentric rectangular coordinates of planet
'
s1 = Sin(v + P - O)
si = Sin(I)
so = Sin(O)
c1 = Cos(v + P - O)
Ci = Cos(I)
co = Cos(O)
x = r * (co * c1 - so * s1 * Ci)
y = r * (so * c1 + co * s1 * Ci)
z = r * (s1 * si)
'
' elements of earth (reusing variables)
'
Element I, O, P, a, e, L, d, 3
'
' position of earth in its orbit
'
m = range2pi(L - P)
v = kepler(m, e, 8)
r = a * (1 - e * e) / (1 + e * Cos(v))
'
' heliocentric rectangular coordinates of earth
'
s1 = Sin(v + P - O)
si = Sin(I)
so = Sin(O)
c1 = Cos(v + P - O)
Ci = Cos(I)
co = Cos(O)
xe = r * (co * c1 - so * s1 * Ci)
ye = r * (so * c1 + co * s1 * Ci)
ze = r * (s1 * si)
'
' convert to geocentric rectangular coordinates
'
x = x - xe
y = y - ye
' z = z
'
' rotate around x axis from ecliptic to equatorial coords
'
ECL = 23.429292 * rads 'value for J2000.0 frame
xe = x
ye = y * Cos(ECL) - z * Sin(ECL)
ze = y * Sin(ECL) + z * Cos(ECL)
'
' find the RA and DEC from the rectangular equatorial coords
'
Select Case index
Case 3
' RA in degrees
planet = Application.Atan2(xe, ye) * degs
If planet < 0 Then planet = 360 + planet
Case 2
' DEC in degrees
planet = Atn(ze / Sqr(xe * xe + ye * ye)) * degs
Case 1
' Radius vector in au
planet = Sqr(xe * xe + ye * ye + ze * ze)
End Select
End Function
'
' The subroutine below replaces the values of i,o,p,a,e,L
' with the values for the planet selected by pnum. You could
' always add planet like objects, but watch the value of
' the inclination i. The method used in planet is only
' good for orbits 'near' the ecliptic.
'
' This is an example of the Visual Basic default 'passing by
' reference'
'
Sub Element(I As Double, O As Double, P As Double, _
a As Double, e As Double, L As Double, _
ByVal d As Double, ByVal pnum As Integer)
Select Case pnum
Case 1 'mercury
I = (7.00487 - 0.000000178797 * d) * rads
O = (48.33167 - 0.0000033942 * d) * rads
P = (77.45645 + 0.00000436208 * d) * rads
a = 0.38709893 + 1.80698E-11 * d
e = 0.20563069 + 0.000000000691855 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (252.25084 + 4.092338796 * d))
Case 2 'venus
I = (3.39471 - 0.0000000217507 * d) * rads
O = (76.68069 - 0.0000075815 * d) * rads
P = (131.53298 - 0.000000827439 * d) * rads
a = 0.72333199 + 2.51882E-11 * d
e = 0.00677323 - 0.00000000135195 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (181.97973 + 1.602130474 * d))
Case 3 'earth
I = (0.00005 - 0.000000356985 * d) * rads
O = (-11.26064 - 0.00013863 * d) * rads
P = (102.94719 + 0.00000911309 * d) * rads
a = 1.00000011 - 1.36893E-12 * d
e = 0.01671022 - 0.00000000104148 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (100.46435 + 0.985609101 * d))
Case 4 'mars
I = (1.85061 - 0.000000193703 * d) * rads
O = (49.57854 - 0.0000077587 * d) * rads
P = (336.04084 + 0.00001187 * d) * rads
a = 1.52366231 - 0.000000001977 * d
e = 0.09341233 - 0.00000000325859 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (355.45332 + 0.524033035 * d))
Case 5 'jupiter
I = (1.3053 - 0.0000000315613 * d) * rads
O = (100.55615 + 0.00000925675 * d) * rads
P = (14.75385 + 0.00000638779 * d) * rads
a = 5.20336301 + 0.0000000166289 * d
e = 0.04839266 - 0.00000000352635 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (34.40438 + 0.083086762 * d))
Case 6 'saturn
I = (2.48446 + 0.0000000464674 * d) * rads
O = (113.71504 - 0.0000121 * d) * rads
P = (92.43194 - 0.0000148216 * d) * rads
a = 9.53707032 - 0.0000000825544 * d
e = 0.0541506 - 0.0000000100649 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (49.94432 + 0.033470629 * d))
Case 7 'uranus
I = (0.76986 - 0.0000000158947 * d) * rads
O = (74.22988 + 0.0000127873 * d) * rads
P = (170.96424 + 0.0000099822 * d) * rads
a = 19.19126393 + 0.0000000416222 * d
e = 0.04716771 - 0.00000000524298 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (313.23218 + 0.011731294 * d))
Case 8 'neptune
I = (1.76917 - 0.0000000276827 * d) * rads
O = (131.72169 - 0.0000011503 * d) * rads
P = (44.97135 - 0.00000642201 * d) * rads
a = 30.06896348 - 0.0000000342768 * d
e = 0.00858587 + 0.000000000688296 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (304.88003 + 0.0059810572 * d))
Case 9 'pluto
I = (17.14175 + 0.0000000841889 * d) * rads
O = (110.30347 - 0.0000002839 * d) * rads
P = (224.06676 - 0.00000100578 * d) * rads
a = 39.48168677 - 0.0000000210574 * d
e = 0.24880766 + 0.00000000177002 * d
L = range2pi(rads * (238.92881 + 3.97557152635181E-03 * d))
End Select
End Sub


{/code]
 

ZVI

MrExcel MVP
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
3,658
I am eventually going to convert the 1998 code below into a class module but what is here may be some start started
There are a lot of extra XX typos in function names in the above code.
For example, DegSinxx() should be DegSin() and so on.

Here is the links to the correct code:
Series of VBA astronomical functions
Astronomical functions2 for Excel (VBA)

In the page of the 1st link you can also find Download example spreadsheet

I would love to see it especially if you have it in a class module
You can simply put the above linked code to the class module.
What benefit of class module vs standard module do you expect?
 
Last edited:

HarryS

Board Regular
Joined
May 2, 2008
Messages
201
Thanks again for your efforts ZVI

'There are a lot of extra XX( ' but not typo's
The use of 'XX(' is to replace the function with one of the same name but not to eliminate it if the NEW version is worse

A class module has the advantage of Listing or reading columns in a sheet using CallByName on the column Headings

Class modules use intellisense to remind old memories what the function or variable was called ( Public or in module)

When the date ( day of ) is changed then many variables need to be recalculated
But if only the time ( HH:MM) is changed then many of these can reused

For those who like the KISS principle

Download the NOAA_Solar_Calculations_Day (or year model) .. It can do a graph in a fraction of a second

If you delete from D4 to the last cell then it is reasonable to use in another sheet

The code below takes about 1/6 sec do do the chart ( xy scatter line on
Code:
Option Explicit
'On another sheet


Private Sub CommandButton21_Click()
    [c5] = Timer
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    CalcG
    OutITT
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    [d5] = Timer - [c5]
End Sub
Sub OutITT()
' makes data labels if XY scatter Graph better to read


    Dim v#, Ri%
    For Ri = 11 To 28
        Cells(Ri, 10) = Format(Cells(Ri, 6), "##.#")
        Cells(Ri, 11) = Format(Cells(Ri, 7), "##.#")
        Cells(Ri, 12) = Format(Cells(Ri, 8), "##.#")
    Next Ri


End Sub
Sub CalcG()


    Dim LH%, Wc As Worksheet, Ti%, Rot%, rS#
    Dim sRiseA#, sSetA#, RiseTime#, SetTime#, RiseAzimuth#, SetAzimuth#




    Set Wc = Sheets("Calculations")
   'NOAA solar Calculations with "D4 to end  deleted
   
   ' Wc.Cells(7, 2) = [b7]  ' set the Date  to whatever is in B7
    Wc.Cells(2, 4) = [b7] ' set the Date  to whatever is in B7
    Rot = 10  ' Row Out
    '
    'sunrise
    RiseTime = Wc.Cells(3, 25)
    Wc.Cells(6, 2) = RiseTime
    RiseAzimuth = Wc.Cells(3, 34)
    sRiseA = Wc.Cells(3, 33)
    RiseAzimuth = Wc.Cells(3, 34)
    RiseTime = RiseTime * 24
    '
    'sunset
    SetTime = Wc.Cells(3, 26)
    Wc.Cells(6, 2) = SetTime
    sSetA = Wc.Cells(3, 33)
    SetAzimuth = 360 - Wc.Cells(3, 34)
    SetTime = SetTime * 24
    For Ti = 5 To 20
        rS = Ti
        If Ti > RiseTime And RiseTime <> 0 Then    ' put in rise
            Rot = Rot + 1
            Cells(Rot, 6) = RiseTime
            Cells(Rot, 7) = sRiseA
            Cells(Rot, 8) = RiseAzimuth
            RiseTime = 0
        End If
        If Ti > SetTime And SetTime <> 0 Then    ' put in set
            Rot = Rot + 1
            Cells(Rot, 6) = SetTime
            Cells(Rot, 7) = sSetA
            Cells(Rot, 8) = SetAzimuth


            SetTime = 0
        End If


        Rot = Rot + 1
        Wc.Cells(6, 2) = rS / 24 ' time
        Cells(Rot, 6) = rS
        Cells(Rot, 7) = Wc.Cells(3, 33)
        Cells(Rot, 8) = Wc.Cells(3, 34)
        If Cells(Rot, 8) > 180 Then Cells(Rot, 8) = 360 - Cells(Rot, 8)


    Next Ti




End Sub
 

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